Tegra 4, Shield and GRID

This evening at the CES media conference staged at Las Vegas, the NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang shows a glossy pic of an NVIDIA GRID server, packed full of GPUs. Also announced this evening was the NIVIDA Tegra 4 mobile processor, with record-setting performance and battery life to flawlessly power smartphones and tablets, gaming devices auto infotainment and navigation systems and PCs. Tegra 4 offers exceptional graphics processing, with lightning-fast web browsing, stunning visuals and new camera capabilities through computational photography.

 

It also enables worldwide 4G LTE voice and data support through an optional chipset, the fifth-generation Icera i500 processor. The GRID rack has 20 GRID servers, with 240 GPUs, with 200 Tflops. That’s equivalent to 700 Xbox 360 systems. But those would consume five times more power and take up far, far more space. Initially, each computing node will support 24 users, not just one like today. That’s with a computer the size of a desktop.



NVIDIA scientists spent a long time making it possible for a GPU to render directly into the cloud, with low latency, creating a server-system that was dedicated and optimized for high-density video-game streaming. They then had to create a software stack that allows a single computer to support and connect to thousands, even millions of users, so each has a unique experience. They needed to create software that receives streamed data in a low-latency way.  All of this took NVIDIA five years.

Why has cloud computing left video games behind? The reason is that it’s a unique medium. Each and every single frame of a 3D graphics application was computed right then and there. It’s not like a pre-recorded movie. The application of 3D graphics involves synthesizing the world with every single frame. The game play, the AI, the physics – it’s all computed in real time for every single frame, at 30-plus frames a second.


 


On stage, Jen-Hsun Huang, NVIDIA CEO shows a glossy pick of an NVIDIA GRID server, packed full of GPUs. Initially, each computing node will support 24 users, not just one like today. That’s with a computer the size of a desktop. A GRID rack has 20 GRID servers, with 240 GPUs, with 200 Tflops. That’s equivalent to 700 Xbox 360 systems. But those would consume five times more powerful and take up far, far more space.

 

 

NVIDIA GRID is the first integrated system product, which we’re selling to partners who sell their service to telcos. Six leading international cloud-gaming companies plan to use the NVIDIA GRID Cloud Gaming Platform to deliver gaming services to global broadband companies, NVIDIA announced today.
The NVIDIA GRID Platform enables the smooth, seamless interactive experience of a high- performance gaming PC anywhere, on any screen – including smart TVs, PCs, tablets and smartphones.


NVIDIA GRID is a server designed to concurrently serve up to 36 times more HD-quality game streams than first-generation cloud-gaming systems, while reducing lag. It is fully integrated with a high density of NVIDIA GPUs, specialised graphics-application streaming software and NVIDIA VGX Hypervisor technology, which allows multiple users to share a GPU.

 

Initial partners on the NVIDIA GRID Platform include Agawi (United States); Cloud Union (China); Cyber Cloud Technologies (China); G-cluster Global (Japan); Playcast Media Systems (Israel); and Ubitus (Taiwan). "Cloud gaming," Jensen said, "is an industry that’s about to take off." 

 

“By using the NVIDIA GRID Platform, our partners will allow gamers to play anywhere, anytime, without being tethered to a box,” said Phil Eisler, general manager of cloud gaming at NVIDIA. “The world’s most exciting games can now be played as easily as you can stream a movie, right onto your TV or mobile device. No more discs to shuffle or files to download and install. Just click and play.”

 

 

At next week’s 2013 International CES event, NVIDIA will demonstrate the NVIDIA GRID Platform streaming games to an LG 55LA6900 Smart TV at 1080p resolution. Among the high- performance games that will be shown are “Assassin’s Creed III” by Ubisoft.

“LG is very impressed by the capabilities of NVIDIA’s GRID Platform to deliver high-quality game streams directly to LG Smart TVs without a game console,” said Bae-Geun Kang, vice president, head of Software Development Group, TV Research Lab, LG. “The NVIDIA GRID Cloud Gaming experience on an LG 55LA6900 Smart TV is beautiful to watch, easy to use and fun to play. It is just like Netflix for games.”

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